November 9, 2020

 

In Canada, we celebrate Remembrance Day on November 11th.

Good evening readers.  I want to take this opportunity to thank those of you who follow my blog.

On November 5th I had my teleconference appointment with my liver specialist Dr. S. Wong.  I am very fortunate and grateful that he is my doctor.  He went over all the blood work that he had ordered prior to this appointment.  All tests were well within normal limits.  My liver function tests normal.  The only problem is the cirrhosis of the liver and that will never go away.  I watch what I eat and hopefully, this will prolong any more negative changes to my liver.  My cirrhosis of the liver is not due to the abuse of alcohol.  As I have mentioned many times in the past I did not drink alcohol because it gave me horrendous migraine headaches.

I have to admit that these last few months have been very depressing.  A close family member who was diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder thirty-three years ago is celebrating a milestone birthday this month.  I decided to devote part of this post to this disorder.  Bipolar Disorder impacts the whole family unit.  At times it can become almost impossible to deal with.  Sadly our family is in the estrangement phase and one never knows whether this will last a month or six months.

The following information comes from https://www.betterhelp.com/.  In the manic phase of Bipolar Disorder, a feeling of being in a “high mood” is often described. While most people like the idea of having increased energy or feeling exhilarated, the feelings associated with bipolar mania can be quite severe. Some symptoms include:

  • Impaired judgment
  • Feeling distracted easily
  • A feeling of being invincible, even in dangerous situations
  • Acts of aggression
  • Engaging in risky behaviour, such as substance abuse or sexual promiscuity
  • Inflated sense of self-esteem
  • Rapid speech, often jumping from one topic to another
  • Racing thoughts and bizarre ideas

When the manic phase of Bipolar disorder has subsided the depressive phase occurs. During this stage, the sufferer may experience extreme sadness or hopelessness. Other symptoms include:

  •  Insomnia
  • Feelings of guilt
  • Weight loss or gain
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Low attention span or difficulty remembering things
  • Poor job or school performance

Being diagnosed with a mood disorder can feel overwhelming.

“At times, being bipolar can be an all-consuming challenge, requiring a lot of stamina and even more courage, so if you’re living with this illness and functioning at all, it’s something to be proud of, not ashamed of. They should issue medals along with the steady stream of medication.”- Carrie Fisher

The COVID 19 numbers continue to rise in our province.  Manitoba has announced more than one thousand new COVID-19 cases in the last three days combined.  Code Red restrictions in Manitoba began today.   Keep well and keep safe.

 

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